Digital Economy Future Directions responses now published

The responses to the Digital Economy Future Directions paper are now up for all and sundry to read. Wikimedia Australia’s is among them (you can also read ours in a more friendly wiki format).

I haven’t had a browse over anyone else’s yet; if you spot anything interesting, please drop a comment and let me know.

17 May, 2009 •

Comment

1

OK,
and hello. I don’t know how much you believe that providing submissions to bureaucrats achieves anything, but you’ve seen my 2c worth in this submissive list.

I’m more inclined to believe that we’re better off actually doing something a bit different, so the unimaginative might think outside their squares.

The idea of linking up remote rooms using stuff like the accessgrid for Wikimania and GLAM might appear more attractive to those with a “forward looking disposition”.
e.g. http://www.wikieducator.org/Funding_proposals/Towards_open_participatory_learning_environments:_Open_textbooks,_educator_training#Improving_collaboration_and_content_interoperability_between_mainstream_OER_projects

Meantime the endless roadshows go on.
http://me.edu.au/b/marktf/entry/edna_futures_discussion_paper
who needs technology when e have trains, planes and autos?
stay well. simon

simonfj · 8. June 2009, 14:16

Elsewhere on the web...

Commenting is closed for this article.

list of all posts, ever

find articles by tag

monthly archive

most popular articles

  1. [guest] Rethinking the Top Ten
  2. How to use Gmail to manage high-traffic mailing lists
  3. An alternative term for "User-generated content"
  4. NLA Innovative Ideas Forum audio/video now available
  5. Write API enabled on Wikimedia sites!
  6. Top 10 software extensions Wikimedia Commons needs in 2008
  7. Is mass collaboration all it's cracked up to be?
  8. GLAM-WIKI, day one
  9. Free MediaWiki hosting offered by Dreamhost Apps
  10. Reflections on PGIP phase 1

(from the last 30 days)